The State of Fashion 2017

Fashion is one of the past decade’s rare economic success stories. Over that period, the industry has grown at 5.5 percent annually, according to the McKinsey Global Fashion Index, to now be worth an estimated $2.4 trillion. In fact, not only does it touch everyone, but it would be the world’s seventh-largest economy if ranked alongside individual countries’ GDP.

Yet 2016 was one of the industry’s toughest years. Terrorist attacks in France, the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom, and the volatility of the Chinese stock market have created shocks to the global economy. At the same time, consumers have become more demanding, more discerning, and less predictable in their purchasing behavior, which is being radically reshaped by new technologies. It’s against this backdrop that McKinsey has teamed with the Business of Fashion to shine a light on the fragmented, complex ecosystem that underpins this giant global industry.

2016: A year to forget

Our first The State of Fashion report (PDF–8MB) finds that it’s not only external shock waves that have roiled the industry. Companies have also been looking inward, implementing changes to the core operations that are reshaping the entire fashion system, from shortening the length of the fashion cycle to integrating sustainable innovation into the core product-design and manufacturing processes. Perhaps unsurprisingly, 67 percent of executives said conditions for the fashion industry have worsened over the past 12 months.

This fact is clearly borne out in the industry’s financial performance. Sales growth seems set to slow to a mere 2 or, at most, 3 percent by the close of 2016, with stagnating profit margins. Speculation and uncertainty over the repercussions of the US election outcome could further dampen consumer sentiment and affect sales. This is in stark contrast to the fashion industry’s performance over the previous decade, which saw the industry expand at 5.5 percent annually.

Yet this sluggish overall growth masks some big winners: affordable luxury, value, and athletic wear.

We strive to provide individuals with disabilities equal access to our website. If you would like information about this content we will be happy to work with you. Please email us at: McKinsey_Website_Accessibility@mckinsey.com


With respect to sales growth, the affordable-luxury and value sectors have outperformed all other segments by one to one-and-a-half percentage points. This is consistent with their compound annual growth rate (CAGR) over the past three years, which has been 9 percent for affordable luxury and 6 percent for value, the highest of any segment since 2013.

Affordable-luxury players benefited from consumers trading down from luxury, particularly among Chinese consumers. However, their profit margins are expected to decline, especially after 2016, because of a pricing-arbitrage disadvantage across geographies and fluctuating foreign-exchange rates.

The value segment continued to grow in 2016, particularly as a consequence of large global players expanding geographically. With its clearly defined value proposition, the value segment has been taking share from discount this year.

In 2016, the 8.0 to 8.5 percent growth for athletic wear is more than double

10 Fashion Icons and the Trends They Made Famous

While the fashion industry continues to introduce us to new styles every season, the industry would not be where it is today without the help of influential fashion icons. Nowadays, celebrities are able to take pictures of their outfit and share it with friends, family, and fans on social media. However, many of the women who invented these iconic styles didn’t have the same influential opportunities, so the fact that we still consider them fashion icons means they must have known what they were doing!

Although today’s celebrities are criticized for what they wear on the red carpet, to the grocery store, and out to dinner, this wasn’t the case for previous generations of stars. Instead, these celebrities whatever they wanted, which is why so many unique trends surfaced during this time. The following 10 fashion icons not only had successful careers, but they also used their keen fashion senses to catapult them into stardom. Here are some of the most influential fashionistas and the trends they made famous:

1. Audrey Hepburn: The Little Black Dress

Some could argue that Audrey Hepburn is the reason for fashion’s obsession with the Little Black Dress. Her classic Holly Golightly look from Breakfast at Tiffany’s is one of the most iconic ‘Old Hollywood’ photos out there. The simple Givenchy column gown, 3-strand pearl necklace, large tortoiseshell sunglasses, sleek updo, diamond earrings, and long cigarette holder will forever be known as an Audrey Hepburn-inspired look!

2. Diana Ross: Maximalist

Although Diana Ross’ style changed over the course of her career, Motown would not be what it is today without her influence. From extravagant wigs to embellished gowns, Diana shed a positive light on the term ‘diva’ and blurred the line between costume and everyday wear.

3. Elizabeth Taylor: Queen of Diamonds

Elizabeth Taylor’s fashion sense can only be described as fearless. She gave off a hint of glamour everywhere she went with her plunging necklines, fur wraps, feather boas, and eye-catching headpieces that would likely be considered over-the-top next to today’s styles. Still, Elizabeth Taylor’s love for glitz and glam resonated with her at all times, and her impact on the fashion industry is still evident.

4. Grace Kelly: The Preppy Princess

2019 Fashion Resale Market and Trend Report

Primary Sources

1. GlobalData Market Sizing: GlobalData’s assessment of the secondhand market is determined through ongoing retailer tracking, official public data, data sharing, store observation, consumers surveys, and secondary sources. These inputs are used by analysts to model and calculate market sizes, channel sizes, and market shares.

2. GlobalData Survey: The consumer data in this report is derived from a consumer survey of 2,000 women. The survey asked them a number of questions about their attitudes towards apparel, secondhand products, and resale products. The sample was designed to be representative of age and income and was also geographically representative. Surveying was undertaken by GlobalData between December 11, 2018 and January 6, 2019.


Secondary Sources

3. Green Story Environmental Study: Independent research firm, Green Story Inc. was contracted to calculate the environmental savings from reuse of secondhand garments sold by thredUP. The study compared the environmental burden of purchasing a brand-new garment with that of reusing an average garment sold by thredUP across all stages of the garment’s lifecycle. The savings were calculated across three areas: greenhouse gas emissions, energy use and water consumption. The study followed international ISO 14040 LCA standard.

4. Ellen MacArthur Foundation: Data from 2015 report, “A New Textiles Economy: Redesigning Fashion’s Future.”

5. Senior Retail Executive Survey: 20 of the top retailers were surveyed in January 2019 about their 2020 Circular Fashion goals.

6. Resale Value Rankings: thredUP evaluated 35,000+ unique brands on its platform and created an aggregate score to determine a brand’s ranking based on demand, virality and value to the seller.

7. Internal thredUP Customer Behavior / Data.

8. EDITED retail analytics.


Retail Sector Definitions

Secondhand: Consumption of all used apparel. Includes both the Resale sector and the Thrift & Donation sector.

Department Stores: A type of general retail store, wherein the retailer displays products within distinct departments, often located on separate floors, specializing in defined product areas. Examples include Bloomingdale’s, Macy’s, Sears, JCPenney, Nordstrom, etc.

Off-Price: A retailer that sells items at lower prices than those typically charged by retail businesses. Off-price stores typically purchase overstocked goods or make special purchases. Examples include TJ Maxx, Marshalls, Ross, Burlington, etc.

Value Chains: Value stores are a retail format that sells inexpensive items, at a single or limited number of price points, like dollar stores. Also includes Walmart.

Mid-Priced Specialty: Specialist clothing retailers operating in the middle of the market in terms of price, i.e. not value but not premium or luxury. Tend to be found in malls or traditional main street locations. Examples include Gap, Ann Taylor

Fast Fashion: Specialist clothing retailers with a fast stock turnaround and whose model relies on selling high volumes at (usually) inexpensive price points. Examples include Zara, H&M, etc.

Direct to Consumer: Online only specialists and generalists selling clothing direct to the public, excludes C2C or auction type sites, also excludes the online part of traditional retail businesses. Examples include Everlane, Outdoor Voices, etc.

Amazon: Amazon’s clothing sales in

Fast Fashion Is A Disaster For Women And The Environment

Why is fast fashion a bad thing? originally appeared on Quora – the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world.

Answer by Ayesha Barenblat, Founder at Remake, on Quora:

  1. Fast fashion is expensive for you and our planet. Fast fashion is designed to be replaced quickly, not so much by desire but by need. Clothing literally falls apart ending up in landfills rather than making it to consignment shops even if you donate. In the U.S. only 10% of donated clothes get resold. The rest floods landfills – we send 13 trillion tons of our clothes to landfills in the U.S. alone where they sit for 200 years leaving toxic chemicals and dyes to contaminate local soil and groundwater. Our slow fashion community has found that investing in fewer higher quality clothes actually saves us money because each piece lasts longer.
  2. Fast fashion disempowers women. With fast fashion you trap a generation of young women into poverty. 75 million people are making our clothes today. 80% is made by women who are only 18 – 24 years old. It takes a garment worker 18 months to earn what a fashion brand CEO makes on their lunch break. A majority of them earn less than $3 per day. The biggest corners fast fashion cuts are human. Cheap clothes are made by underage workers entering the industry as young as 14 to work long hard hours (an avg. of 14 hrs per day in sweatshops) for low wages, while dealing with sexual harassment.
  3. Fast fashion is a disaster for our planet. The largely unregulated churn and burn of fast fashion is putting too much pressure on our planet. 12.8 million tons of clothing are sent to landfills in the US every year. This is a football field filled 14 ft deep with clothes. The fashion industry’s CO2 emissions are projected to increase by more than 60% to nearly 2.8 billion tons per year by 2030. Main cotton producing countries like China and India are already facing water shortages, and with water consumption projected to go up 50% by 2030, these cotton-growing nations face the dilemma of choosing between cotton production and securing clean drinking water.
  4. Our money is what makes the fashion world go round. By disrupting the status quo, we have the power to change things. When we buy better we send market signals to change the system for good.

This question originally appeared on Quora – the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world. You can follow Quora on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+. More questions:

Source Article

The state of fashion 2019

The year ahead will be an awakening after the reckoning of 2018—a time for fashion companies to look at opportunities and not just at surmounting challenges. The ones that will succeed will have come to terms with the fact that in the new paradigm taking shape around them, some of the old rules simply don’t work. Regardless of size and segment, players now need to be nimble, think digital-first, and achieve ever-faster speed to market. They need to take an active stance on social issues, satisfy consumer demands for radical transparency and sustainability, and, most important, have the courage to “self-disrupt” their own identity and the sources of their old success to realize these changes and win new generations of customers.

They also need to invest in enhancing their productivity and resilience, as the outlook is uncertain. External shocks to the system continue to lurk, and growth cannot be taken for granted.

Video

Ten trends defining the fashion industry agenda in 2019


These are some of the findings from our latest report on The State of Fashion, written in partnership with the Business of Fashion (BoF), which explores the industry’s fragmented, complex ecosystem. Our first two reports, last year and the year before, laid the foundation for rigorous in-depth research and analysis, focusing on the themes, issues, and opportunities affecting the sector and its performance. The State of Fashion is now the largest and most authoritative overview of the industry, surveying more than 275 global fashion executives (approximately 30 percent more than last year) and interviewing thought leaders and pioneers. We also highlight the ten trends that will define the fashion agenda in 2019 (interactive).



The report includes the third readout of our industry benchmark, the McKinsey Global Fashion Index. This database of more than 500 companies allows us to analyze and compare the performance of individual companies with their peers, by category, segment, or region.

Sunny intervals but storms ahead

For fashion players, 2019 will be a year of awakening. External shocks to the system continue to lurk around the corner, and growth cannot be taken for granted: the McKinsey Global Fashion Index forecasts growth of 3.5 to 4.5 percent, slightly below 2018 figures. By geography, the most optimistic about the coming year are executives in North America. By segment, the most positive are executives from luxury brands, reflecting their strong growth trajectory in 2018. In all other regions and segments, executives are notably pessimistic, reflecting the potential challenges ahead (Exhibit 1).

We strive to provide individuals with disabilities equal access to our website. If you would like information about this content we will be happy to work with you. Please email us at: McKinsey_Website_Accessibility@mckinsey.com

All this comes against a backdrop of the fashion industry having turned a corner in 2018, with increased growth justifying the optimism expressed in last year’s global fashion survey. The caution in the economic outlook is also reflected in the BoF–McKinsey State of Fashion Survey,

How to Become a Fashion Designer: 14 Steps (with Pictures)

About This Article

Article SummaryX

If you want to become a fashion designer, enroll in a school for fashion design, where you can study fabrics, sewing techniques, and the history of fashion. If school isn’t for you, apply for an apprenticeship or internship working for a fashion designer. As you’re completing your training, design and create clothing for customers to build your portfolio. Once you’ve completed school or your internship, you can either apply for jobs with different clothing manufacturers or you can start your own clothing label. For tips on assembling your fashion portfolio, keep reading!

  • Print
  • Send fan mail to authors
Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 2,549,326 times.

Source Article

1960s Fashion – Mod Fashion

1960s fashion

1960s Fashion – Mod fashion was innovative, creative, bold and brash. 60s fashion belonged to London, England. The British set the tone and the world followed.

What we wear has always defined us to some degree. At the very least, it can indicate economic status, but always before within certain confines of convention. Historically, a uniformity of dress created a homogeneous population.

The 1960s ushered in an attitude of “anything goes” and reflected the shifting politics of the day. “Do your own thing” applied to clothes as well.

The fashion revolution was youth oriented and youth driven and began in the streets rather than the old line couture houses. The Baby Boomers were coming of age.

The boutique clothing store emerged in the 1960s as “the happening” place to shop. They were fun and hip and young people felt more comfortable shopping there. No geography was more famous for swinging boutiques than Carnaby Street and Kings Road in London. Not to be left out of the trend, Paraphernalia opened in 1965 on Madison Avenue in New York and was an instant smash.

Color played a big role in defining the look. The muted and pastel palette of 1950s fashions gave way to bright, bold color often splayed in geometric patterns. From day wear to Day Glo in less than a decade.

A word about the word – Mod. Mod for modern, which in its purest use meant minimalist. Arguably there is nothing minimal about most Mod fashion, but that is the origin.

On this page you’ll find some of the more memorable Fashion Designers of the 1960s

Source Article

Fashion Month – PAPER

Online Shopping Site – Shop Men & Women Fashion Online in India

Still waiting for a revolutionary online shopping website? Well, wait no more. Limeroad.com is here with an amazing platform that not only lets you shop for your style but also lets you discover your style and share it with world. Limeroad welcomes all you fashionable men and women to scroll through a never ending variety of the most fashionable apparels, accessories, shoes and more. Not just that, with the amazing and exclusive Scrapbook feature, Limeroad.com lets you create fashionable looks using your own style sensibilities and share them with people from all corners. Discover your style and shop for your style only on Limeroad.com. Stay trendy with Limeroad.com!

Engage now!

India’s Most Stylish Online Shopping Site, Limeroad.com, Brings You the Best Trends of the Season

• Limeroad.com is the best online shopping site for all you fashionable women and men who never let style slip away. We have a collection featuring the latest apparels, accessories, footwear as well as home décor for all you fashionable people to shop from. What you find on Limeroad is right what’s trending. We keep our catalogue updated with the latest trends so you never go out of style. Make Limeroad.com your ultimate shopping site and stay trendy always.

Explore now!

Shop from the Latest Catalogue of Women Clothing, Accessories and Footwear

• Alert all fashionistas! It’s time for you get all trendy with collection of the most fashionable women clothing live on Limeroad. Check out our stunning range of dresses for girls that are in trend this season. Shop from a diversity of prints, patterns and designs. We have the best collection for casual wear, office wear as well as party wear. Pick yours today. You can also shop from the season’s chicest tops on Limeroad.com. You will find a diversity to suit your own unique style. For high fashion lovers, we have range of designer tops in our collection. Along with that, we get you some of the most stunning jumpsuits and rompers in our collection. Also, our range of bottom wear is a must for all you fashionistas to look at. Purchase some of the most fashionable jeans for girls, jeggings, shorts, skirts, palazzos and more on Limeroad. Our brand list is also all glitzy. We offer apparels from Vero Moda, Only, And, Label Ritu Kumar, United Colors of Benetton and many more. • You can also shop from a collection consisting of the most stunning ethnic wear. Choose from some of the most stylish kurtis from our catalogue. We get you a collection of diverse designer kurtis from some of the most high fashion brands. Plus, we offer a range of stylish sarees, salwar suits, lehenga choli, Dupattas, Leggings, Churidar salwars, Blouse Designs and a lot more. Choose you desi look on Limeroad. • We have also uncovered the season’s most stylish winter wear for all you fashionistas to choose from. Buy sweaters, jackets, cardigans shrugs and more from Limeroad’s stylish catalogue. Stay in style! • Apart from apparels, Limeroad also

The Fashion Office

About us

We are the premier styling and production company specializing in the fashion, beauty, entertainment and hospitality industries. Based in Nashville, TN The Fashion Office has been creating powerful imagery for over 20 years.

Milton White is an award winning fashion industry veteran, his resume reflects many years of experience as a fashion editor, celebrity stylist, fashion show producer and publicist. After years in New York City and the Washington DC area Milton returned to his native Nashville roots as the Style and Media Director of The Fashion Office. Milton shares his creative talent with a wide variety of private clients as well.

Milton’s work has been featured on Vogue.it (Vogue Italia), Papercut Mag and Design Scene as well in People Country, Country Weekly, Wherever, Nfocus, Nashville Lifestyles, Nashville Scene, Nashville Post, Native and Mocha Market magazines. Milton has dressed clients for the ACM Awards, Cannes Film Festival, CMT Music Awards, CMA Awards, New York Fashion Week and Swan Ball.

Milton currently serves on the board of Bootstraps Foundation and Nashville PRIDE, and supports Belcourt Theatre, Nashville CARES, Nashville Humane Association and TPAC.

Services

Celebrity Dressing

Designer Collection Presentations & Personal Appearances

Event Press

Event Production

Fashion Show Press

Fashion Show Production

Fundraisers

Image Consulting

Personal Shopping & Styling

Product Launches & Openings

Retail Consulting

Sponsorship Development

Trend Forecasting

Trend Presentations

Visual Merchandising

Source Article